First A1c!


For those of you who follow me on twitter you know that I recently went to the doctors to get my first a1c since my diagnosis. For those of you who don’t follow me on twitter, you should @typeonefun. When I was diagnosed with diabetes my a1c was 9.8. So you can imagine I was quite nervous/anxious leading up to this test and waiting for my results. However the results are in and my new a1c is a 5.2! I am very happy with this number but I was nervous about some of the blood cells still left over from my diagnosis affecting the outcome of this a1c. That apparently was not the case.

My doctor said that the 5.2 is too low and that I have been too aggressive with managing my diabetes. I however to do not agree with him. While I might be aggressive with management, I am happy with the results and am happy with the management routine I am doing. If I were constantly having low blood sugars or if my management was interfering with my life I would agree with the doctor. But that is not the case at all. I quite satisfied with my diet and the foods I eat. And I am happy with my exercise routine.

The exercise I do has been very helpful with managing my diabetes. Before I started working out and bike riding regularly I was using around 25 units of insulin a day including my basal rate. Now, due to the exercise, I take around 14 units of insulin daily. And some of this is due to my pump because I can now take fractions of a unit unlike using the pens where I can only take whole units.

I also believe that my low carb diet is helpful in managing my diabetes. I try to eat less then 80 grams of carb per day and usually average less than 50. Going out to eat throws this off sometimes but oh well you have to splurge once in a while. My theory is that the less carbs I intake the less chance there is for my blood sugar to get high.

Now one could argue that is easier for me to manage my diabetes because I am still in the “honeymoon” period. Which is definitely true. I am for sure still honeymooning and therefore my blood sugars are easier to manage. However another theory of mine is that if I keep tight control over my blood sugar and keep the load off my pancreas, I can prolong my honeymoon phase and preserve my remaining beta cells for a while.

But all in all I am very please with the outcome of my first a1c. I hope I can keep a good grip on my diabetes and can continue to have low a1c’s.

May DSMA Blog Carnival


Better late then never!

The prompt for the May DSMA Blog Carnival:

What do you consider to be your Diabetes Strengths?  What do you think are your Diabetes Weaknesses?

Well I will begin with my weaknesses. Obviously the first thing that comes to mind is that I have zero weaknesses and am the perfect diabetic/person/diabetic person. Ha! Hardly! I think at this stage in my life with diabetes, one of my biggest weaknesses is the lack of knowledge I have. And maybe I don’t actually have a severe lack of knowledge pertaining to diabetes, but I FEEL like I do and that makes me just as ‘weak’ as actually lacking in knowledge. I think in actuality I probably know about the same as your average diabetic but I just have this huge feeling that I am missing out on some important piece of information vital to life with diabetes. Though I am probably not.

This early on into diabetes, I am still very much overwhelmed with everything (insulin shots, finger sticks, dieting etc.) which is also a weakness of mine. I am definitely starting feel in control and probably portray control/seem fairly underwhelmed to my family and friends, but that is not the case. It getting there but not yet. And maybe the portrayal of control/acting is more of a weakness then the actual feeling of being overwhelmed. Either way both should pass in due time.

On the other hand, one of my biggest strengths would be how seriously I am taking my new life with diabetes. I have been dropped into a new world full of change and I have tried hard to be as responsible as possible to become a healthy diabetic (via taking insulin, watching what I eat, checking blood sugars, getting into the D-tech, etc.). I have heard many stories about people with diabetes (both type 1 and 2) who go into denial or do not take the disease seriously and end up either dying or becoming super unhealthy/having lots of medical problems. Those stories scare me and inspire me to be a ‘good diabetic’ and not be like them. And my hope for the future is that I can continue to take this seriously and maintain my health.

Diabetes Therapy Weekend


Happy Memorial Day weekend every one! I hope each and every one of you has a relaxing/productive/stress free/what ever kind of weekend. Any one have any special plans this weekend?

This weekend I have embarked on what I am calling a Diabetes Therapy Session. However the name might be a tad misleading because a Diabetes Therapy Session (DTS) is really just me chilling at a lake house with my dog and family and going out on the boat. That being said, there is some therapy involved here. Living with diabetes can be very stressful and overwhelming, and everyone needs to have some time to do something/anything to take their minds off of blood sugars/diabetes/whatever every now and then. Whether it is going out of town/vacation, going to a the movies, or simply diving into a good book, every one needs a getaway now and again. Mine is just taking that form of a lake house and boat.

Even though this was supposed to be a diabetes free weekend (or as free as one can be with diabetes), I still encountered a rough patch. We ate dinner at a 50s style diner in town and I essentially carb-o-loaded like I was running a marathon. I had a pulled pork sandwich (bun and all), onion rings and some tator tots. Yum! So of course I got paranoid that my blood sugar levels were going to reach new heights so I took some insulin. And then I took a bit more. And the next thing I know, I go from 160 to 48 in the span of an hour: sweats, shakes, light headed, extreme hunger. Not pleasant at all

But all in all it was a good learning experience. And I have been having a blast on the boat and playing cards with my parents and other things associated with lake houses.

Remember: find a getaway!

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Endocrinologist Appointment


Today I went to see the endocrinologist that my family doctor recommended to me, and unfortunately I did not get very much out of the experience. Knowledgeable, nice, personable guy and had very nice and well mannered nurses, but unfortunately he did not tell me anything I did not know already.

For whatever reason I had high hopes for this visit and went there thinking that some mind opening, game changing information would be given to me. But that was not the case. I should not have been thinking that way to being with. In fact, I had been thinking several days ago that maybe I should have just canceled my appointment because it was already a month after my diagnosis and I was getting in a pretty good routine as it is (CGM, blood testing, insulin dosing, counting carbs etc.). So as it were, I will be more then likely going back to the family doctor for A1c tests and checkups. Which is perfectly fine by me. The doctor and I have a good relationship and he is very knowledgeable on Diabetes (as well as other doctoral subjects).

On the bright side, the endocrinologist did give me a bunch of literature for insulin pumps, which I have been thinking about investing in soon. I do not have a clue which one I would want and still need to do plenty of research on the subject. But the literature he provided was a step in the right direction for that.

DBlogWeek Wildcard #1


Back by popular demand, let’s revisit this prompt from last year! Tell us what your fantasy diabetes device would be? Think of your dream blood glucose checker, delivery system for insulin or other meds, magic carb counter, etc etc etc. The sky is the limit – what would you love to see?

Because I had so much fun writing for Diabetes Blog Week this past week, I figured I would continue the fun by writing on the wildcard topics during the next couple of days.

This topic is very interesting and I believe that this pretty much covers my fantasy diabetes device. And hopefully within the next couple of years this will move from fantasy to the realm of reality. The artificial pancreas will be a huge break through for the Diabetics of the world. The artificial pancreas will essentially automate the blood sugar testing and insulin administering, and pretty much take the place of all pumps and CGM’s. I cannot wait for this innovation and also cannot wait to see where science/technology takes Diabetes.